colonandrectalspecialists
  1. INTRODUCTION
    • CGDSEM AOR

The area of responsibility of Coast Guard Southeastern Mindanao (CGDSEM) covers the coastal waters of the province of Surigao Del Sur in the north stretching towards west to the province of Saranggani and down to the Island of Balut in the south. It also includes important bodies of water engulfing Davao region, namely; Davao Gulf, Malalag Bay of Davao Del Sur and Mayo Bay of Davao Oriental. It has a coastline extending to about 1,746 kilometers and sprawling across a water jurisdiction of about 13,747 square kilometers. Its coastal areas provide settings to six (6) cities, 48 municipalities and 1,160 coastal barangays.

  • DAVAO GULF

Davao Gulf cuts into Davao Region from the Celebes Sea. It is surrounded by four provinces of said region comprising of Davao Del Sur, Davao Del Norte, Compostela Valley and Davao Oriental. A cluster of islands can be found in the gulf collectively known as the Islands Garden City of Samal. The gulf is a major fishing ground and its ranked 10th among the 24 fisheries statistical areas of the country. It also serves as the center of marine biodiversity in the region that is rich in variety of marine life. On the gulf’s west coast sprawl a number of ports serving the local and international vessels. Record shows that an average of 21, 500 vessels and about 1760 of which are foreign call the different ports of Davao. These different ports link trade and commerce to other ports of the world such as those in Hong Kong, Singapore, China, Australia, Middle East, Europe and USA. The gulf is also provides the environment for local water transport as there about 54 established routes crisscrossing within its waters and serving the transportation needs of the surrounding communities . There are about 343 clusters of residential communities situated along the coasts of Davao Gulf taking advantage of the convenience and economy of water transport. It is by these features that the gulf can be described as a very ecologically, economically and socially important area to Davao region.

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1. Flowerpatch

ABOUT:

Flower Patch opened on May 4, 2012 and is located at 38A Pearl St. corner C.Raymundo Ave. Doña Juana Subd. Rosario Pasig

Owners have complete understanding about flowers and in the industry due to decade of experience before Flower Patch. We are very confident of the quality of our flowers, designs and service. We see to it that we pay attention even to the tiniest detail and keep our designs presentable, elegant and dynamic to help customers nurture and enhance their relationships with the important people of their lives. Posted flower arrangements are all our actual designs and orders of our valued clients and were not downloaded from the internet.

We know how important it is to you that the flowers you send express your feeling and bring much appreciation from the recipient. We are determined to continue the tradition of flowers through innovative, contemporary, classy and good quality flower arrangements and exceptional customer service.

Flower Patch offers flower arrangements whether it is for a specific occasion, such as birthdays, a wedding, a funeral, an anniversary, inaugurals, Valentine’s day, mother's day, graduation day, a new baby, or whether it is just to say “Congratulations”, “Get well”, “Thank you”, “I miss you” or “I’m sorry”. 

send them flowers NOW!

MISSION :

To offer good quality flowers, classy design arrangements and gifts for any occasion.

To help our customers enhance and nurture their relationships.

To provide exceptional customer service, to meet the needs and expectations of our valued customers.

To make every no occasion and special occasion more beautiful, memorable and enjoyable.

VISION :

Continue to grow a profitable business

Consumers’ top choice flower shop.

CONTACT:

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+63917.891.7402 |  +63947.990.2281 | +63925.391.7402

+632.848.3071

LOCATION : 

38A Pearl St. corner C. Raymundo Ave Doña Juana Subd. Rosario Pasig City.

WEBSITE: https://yourflowerpatch.com/

TESTIMONIALS:

"I'm Overseas and I've usually had a hard time looking for flower shop in Manila that don't charge you an arm and a leg. This shop is a blessing from heaven! From the quick responses through Viber, on time delivery, to easy and safe way of payment through Paypal. Will definitely purchase flowers from here again." 

see more testimonials here: https://yourflowerpatch.com/

Two (2) officials from the Cooperative Association of Japan Shipbuilders (CAJS) comprised of its Managing Director, Mr Sekimoto, and Mr Takashi Shioiri, Director, Shipbuilding JETRO Singapore, will extend their follow-on visit to the University of Perpetual Help System DALTA (Las Piñas Campus) on Oct 10, 2019 in preparation for the planned MOA signing between CAJS and UPHSD concerning internship program that will be implemented at the member shipyards of CAJS under the auspices of the Nippon Foundation.

The said internship program will provide deserving UPHSD BS Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering (BSNAME) studentsand/or graduates the opportunity to acquire high level of expertise by allowing the interns the opportunity to experience practical training in any of the CAJS member shipyards.

During its 26th anniversary celebration in June 2009. Coast Guard District Western Visayas adopted seemingly “old-new” theme- passionate coastguarding. Old because “passion” is an oft-used word to describe something or someone of intensity, to the point of being a cliché. New because the word is not a favorite to describe or characterize a technical thing, more so a technical service that is engaged in the serious business of safety and security. But despite the lack of bravado, they are interesting and substantial words that one can live by.

As the Philippine Coast Guard celebrates its 108th founding anniversary, there is that compelling urge to visit those words anew. For the words seem to sound a theme good not only for one anniversary but for many anniversaries. It might even be a theme for “all seasons”.

At a glance it may seem unlikely theme. The words do not seem to fit, or go along well like a mismatched pair. It doesn’t evoke the aura of loftiness, nay seriousness of common themes – say “Dedicated and Committed Coast Guard”. It also doesn’t conjure the nationalistic fervor of one framed in the national language, like – “Malinis, mapayapa at ligtas na karagatan” Still, the words have certain charm and appeal that seem to resonate well to those who desire (or demand) more from the Coast Guard. They reflect the yearning better and go beyond the normal. Although the operative word is coast guarding, one cannot help to be titillated by the modifier. Indeed, one is wont to think of the sensual or temporal when we speak of “passionate”, ignoring its other equally interesting meanings. Even the Greek ‘pathos’ where the word passionate was derived exudes several meanings e.g. – something that happen to you bad or good, intense feelings of want or need, showing great love and affection, etc. Just the first two definitions could already evoke a wide spectrum of meanings and interpretations, a testament to the encompassing and overarching power of the word.

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Bureau of Immigration Commissioner Jaime Morente disclosed that 71-year-old Alfons Hermann Keittl was arrested last Thursday in Ozamis City, Misamis Occidental by operatives from the bureau’s fugitive search unit (FSU). Morente said Keittl’s deportation was sought by the German embassy in Manila which informed the Bureau of Immigration about an arrest warrant that a local court in the town of Landshut, Germany issued against the fugitive last July.

Coast Guard District Southern Tagalog (CGDSTL) is located in the fast rising economic center of the country where the Strong Republic Nautical Highway connects the five(5) major ports that ply the following routes: Batangas – Calapan; Batangas – Romblon; Batangas – Abra de Ilog; Roxas – Caticlan and Lucena – Marinduque. Through the years, the CGDSTL amidst the enormous responsibility at hand was able to perform its multifarious functions and address needs of the maritime community in the area of responsibility. In line with the Commandant’s COMPASS: Capacity Building Measures, Operating  Environment Awareness, Aggressive Training and Recruitment, Strategic Deployments and Visibility, Total Vigilance and Preparedness, Growth in Service and Support System, Unity of Action Through Partnership, Accountable Finance and Logistic System, Responsible Maritime Governance, Development of Doctrines and Maritime Regimes. Parallel to the program ensuring safer ships, cleaner seas and secure maritime environment, the following are the CGDSTL’S accomplishment for this year.

The Bureau of Immigration (BI) urged aspiring Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) to avoid human traffickers and illegal recruiters who would prey on their vulnerabilities, after the agency uncovered the recurrence a modus operandi of a syndicate that houses and trains its victims at safe houses before deployment abroad. Bureau of Immigration Commissioner Jaime Morente issued the reminder after two women were recently barred from leaving the country for misrepresenting their age and narrating their experience with the syndicate that recruited them. The women had alleged that they were kept by their handlers in a safehouse in Paco, Manila for two months before they were booked for their flights.

Morente instructed the bureau’s port operations division (POD) and travel control and enforcement unit (TCEU) to conduct strict profiling and inspection of departing passengers to ensure that no underage OFWs are able to leave. According to Bureau of Immigration POD chief Grifton Medina, the two women, aged 19 and 20, were intercepted last Sept. 21 at the NAIA terminal 2 in their attempt to board a connecting flight from Dubai to Saudi Arabia. Medina said the passengers both presented valid passports, visas, job contract, and overseas employment certificates but the birth dates in their documents were intentionally altered to make it appear that they meet the age requirement for Household Service Workers which is 23 years. “Both women initially claimed that they were 26 years old, but eventually admitted their real age upon questioning,” Medina said. Bureau of Immigration-TCEU chief Timotea Barizo said that the women recounted how they were housed for two months at a safehouse in Manila where they were briefed and taught by their recruiters how to respond to questions from immigration officers. “We've heard this in the past, usually victims would be briefed a few days before their flight. But now they're actually housed for months to train on how to evade immigration questioning," said Barizo. "The two victims admitted that their documents were given only prior to departure, and that they were told to open it only after check in. This forces them to go on and comply with the scheme despite the discrepancy since they are already there,” Barizo said. Morente reiterated his reminder to OFWs not to fall prey to these schemes. "Transact only with legitimate agencies accredited by the POEA (Philippine Overseas Employment Administration)," he reminded.

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Few may choose to tread the long and narrow path but as the Bible tells us, it is the path that leads to something better and brighter. When first the PCG was separated from the PN, not many dared to cast their lots with it. What happened resonates deeply with the concept of maritime trade of olden days when a voyage is deemed an adventure redolent with risks and danger yet may unexpectedly turn into a highly profitable endeavor. The PCG experience is parallel to that part of maritime history. Yet it has now emerged successful in the gamble that it took 11 years ago. To date the PCG Bill or the law that seeks to not only update RA 5173 as amended but also to modernize and empower the Philippine Coast Guard has already reached 3rd reading in the Senate, thanks to the unanimous support of the Senate Committee on National Defense, Chaired by Sen. Rodolfo Biazon and the whole Philippine Senate. It has now been calendared to be presented in the bicameral session of Congress on November 2009.

            In anticipation of the passage of SB 3389, a cursory look into the salient provisions of the would be Coast Guard law will help everyone, PCG personnel and the public alike, to understand the Coast Guard as an entity. One of the most basic changes that SB No. 3389 made  is as follows:

            SEC 2. Establishment. – The Philippine Coast Guard, hereinafter referred to as the PCG, is hereby established as an armed and uniformed service attached to the Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC): Provided, That in times of war,  as declared by congress, the PCG or parts thereof, shall be attached to the Department of Nationals Defense.

The much daunted “global crisis” has prompted some of the world’s leading financial technocrats and managers to review and redefine their respective country’s existing trading and economic policies in order to mitigate the long –term. In this case of the Philippines, our country is “probably fortunate” to have the usual financial miracle coming from the much need Dollar remittances from the more than Ten (10) million Overseas Filipino Workers (OFW) that span from Europe, Middle East, Austral-Asia and the continental United States including all oceans of the world (of course, we have to include our seafarers). The infusion of the green bucks from our OFWs, more often stabilizes the country’s Balance of Payment thereby alleviating our country’s dependency on the U.S. dollar. But for how long are we going to be dependent on our OFW remittances in order to literally save our economy from unforeseen fortuitous economic events?

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